project

Rubia Braun project

Rubia Braun project

Fairlie Cottrill thesis

Fairlie Cottrill thesis

blink

blink

Ash Perry thesis

Ash Perry thesis

Advocacy Journalism: Rethinking Bias, Balance and Neutrality

abstract: 

What follows is a folio of three first-person journalistic features I wrote in my honours year,1 and an exegesis that gives a reflective analysis of these features.

The first feature, ‘Mixed Signals’, was written under academic supervision. It is not thematically linked to the second two, and contains fewer primary sources. This is because — despite repeated attempts — I failed to get ethics clearance for a proposed article about Tamil men charged with terror offences, by late August.

The second and third essays — ‘Guns, Guards & Gates’ and ‘Thought-crime and punishment’ — were written before I secured a supervisor. They have been published.

In all these essays, I intended to write literary journalism, but instead I wrote in the tradition of journaliste engagé, or ‘advocacy journalism’, which is evidence- based but sets out to advance a specific viewpoint.

In examining the methods by which I constructed these features, my exegesis considers whether ‘advocacy journalism’ is an oxymoron or a redundant phrase. It argues that, while in some ways my features take a journalistic approach, they are ultimately not journalism as it is ideally understood.

My exegesis explores where advocacy and journalism meet, where they depart, why this matters, and where method and a more narrative approach might prevent this departure. In doing this, I consider common understandings of bias, balance and fairness.

author/s: 
links: 

supervisor: Margaret Simons

This research consisted of three published literary journalism articles and an exegesis. They are not available via this site due to copyright restrictions, and contain sensitive information concerning informants and sources.

Taking communications seriously: The need for a public relations consultancy catering to Victoria’s nonprofit sector

Fairlie Cottrill thesis
abstract: 

To provide an analysis of the relevance and value of a public relations consultancy catering to Victoria’s nonprofit sector. Public relations campaigns and activities can be implemented at low cost, making it suitable and valuable for nonprofit organisations. Many nonprofit organisations, however, do not use public relations in such a way as to maximise their ability, opportunities, means and reach to achieve their overall goals and objectives. Nonprofit organisations have different needs to the corporate sector, thereby indicating the need for a communications consultancy catering solely to the nonprofit sector. Research into current public relations practices by the nonprofit sector indicates such organisations have a lack of resources, knowledge and interest, thereby demonstrating the potential need for a consultancy that additionally provides public relations education and training opportunities to nonprofit organisations, creating a long term impact.

author/s: 

Don't Try This At Home: Television for Australian Children Aged Eight to Ten

Rubia Braun project
abstract: 

This project was interested in examining what could be an example of a ‘quality’ Australian Children’s television program. Limited research exists, which demonstrates what is important to take into consideration when creating a children’s television production. This project then, set about creating a television program based on research that was educational and entertaining, appealed to children, satisfied legislation, and took into consideration the viewpoints of parents and children’s television producers. This will give a practical example of what a quality Australian children’s television program could be.

author/s: 
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supervisor: Leo Berkeley

This project consisted of a pilot episode of a children's television series, and an exegesis. The exegesis is available below as a PDF.

Contemporary Continuity: Old Practice, New Technology

Kristin Stephensen project
abstract: 

The professional practice of Continuity Supervising is engaged in a co-existence between its traditional responsibilities and the new on-set technologies that the role is often encouraged to employ. At present, current texts do not address this co-existence; they examine only the more traditional practices. In a response to this problem, this research project aims to explore the interaction between old practice and new technology, as it presently exists within the role of Continuity Supervising. In parallel with this investigation, a key objective is to explore new types of audiovisual texts that reflect some of the theoretical concepts emerging out of the research inquiry.

author/s: 
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supervisor: Seth Keen

This project consisted of an interactive QuickTime project which modelled a continuity tool. It also has an exegesis. The exegesis is available from the link below, as is an appendix.

BLINK: Tackling the communication flux within the Asia-Pacific region

blink
abstract: 

This research project examines cross-cultural advertising and communication in the Asia-Pacific region. It looks at the issues and concerns raised by industry practitioners through a series of interviews, centred around several main threads. These concerns were the need for localisation of campaigns to effectively promote the product, difficulty in language when targeting international markets, and the concerns regarding the need for a high level of understanding of the local cultural and religious environment to ensure that offence is not committed, and that a culturally relevant communication could be produced. For advertising and marketing agencies without in-country offices, access to this type of information and support is almost non-existent. This led to the proposal for a solution in the form of BLINK: A cultural facilitation agency. This is achieved through a handbook, two separate DVDs and a website. The website promotes the solution of the use of a specialised cultural facilitation agency by advertising and marketing companies wishing to enter the Asia-Pacific marketplace.

author/s: 

This project consisted of a DVD of interviews, and an exegesis. The exegesis is available as a PDF below.

Future of Food

Veronica Ridge project
abstract: 

The project is a series of four articles, and one shorter story, written specifically for ‘Epicure’, the food and wine section of The Age newspaper. They were published on August 28, October 2 and October 23 (three articles). Each article was researched and written to give readers insight into current food trends and philosophical arguments in line with the project’s title, ‘Future of Food.’ The style of feature writing employed was designed to be suitable for publication in a number of metropolitan daily broadsheets and their food and wine sections. I judged this suitability on the basis of my own experience editing such sections and working in the industry over 34 years. Newspapers that have such sections include The Age, The Australian, Sydney Morning Herald (after publication on 23 October the Sydney Morning Herald’s Good Living section asked for permission to print ‘Moving up the Food Chain’). Other suitable sections within these newspapers would be Insight (The Age), The Inquirer (The Australian) or Spectrum (Sydney Morning Herald). I understand from information I have been given as editor of ‘Epicure’ 4 that the profile of ‘Epicure’ readers is heavily in the AB demographic, which means the readership is skewed towards those who earn more than the average wage and are tertiary qualified. Based on my experience, including 10 years as a section editor, I judge that when our readers pick up The Age they want a good read and are willing to set aside the time to mull over an interesting feature story. They expect to be told something they don’t already know so an important part of editing is identifying current food trends and issues and publishing writing that will capture their attention and inform them in an entertaining and compelling way.

author/s: 
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supervisor: Margaret Simons

This project consisted of four published newspaper articles (as detailed in the abstract). Due to copyright restrictions these are not duplicated here, however they are available in any library that holds copies of The Age, and maybe available via http://www.theage.com.au/news/epicure/

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