2007

labsome Lunch

labsome lunch, 2007

In late 2007 we had a lunch in labsome. It was a way to wind up the year as we had the lunch just before final work was submitted. We all had to bring some food and it ended up being a bit of a feast. And then to top it we had some students from 2006 (Iz, Rubia and Ash) also join us.

San: The Short Script

abstract: 

This project explored the creative writing practice of screenwriting. How do I write an engaging thirty minute short film script?

Given the number of published approaches to writing for screen, combined with the personal nature of creative writing, research without practice cannot truly determine how an individual can write an engaging film of any length.

My project is a thirty minute short film script about an assassin, San, who executes the “bad” for the benefit of the greater good. It explores themes surrounding moral ambiguity and clashing worldviews.

The outcome has left me greater technical knowledge regarding the form of film, as well as an understanding of how to engage in the practice of screenwriting. The thirty-minute short film is practical evidence of my growth as a screenwriter. It is something I can make, or develop into a feature.

Below you will find a link to the exegesis of Chelvendra's short film script, submitted with the script for assessment as the major project undertaken during the Bachelor of Communication (Honours).

Karen Leverenz

Karen Leverenz

I completed my undergraduate degree, Bachelor of Arts (Media), at RMIT in 2006. My majors were Cinema Studies and Television Production. I see Honours as an opportunity for me to put the knowledge I have gained throughout my life and in my undergrad degree to use. I hope to achieve a portfolio that demonstrates my interests and abilities to future employers, but more importantly to myself.

links: 

research project: Immersion Journalism

email: 

karenleverenz at hotmail dot com

Baby's too

Baby's too

Adrian's daughter attended as an observer on the Halls Gap field trip.

Halls Gap, you always find me in the ...

Halls Gap, you always find me in the ...

In 2007 we had a field trip to Halls Gap. On the first night the students cooked up a storm for everyone in the YHA kitchen. This is Kris, Nico, Arnie and Viv.

Labsome's biggest lunch

Labsome's biggest lunch

Towards the end of 2007 we held the inaugural labsome lunch. We all bought a contribution and had a long feast to celebrate the end of the semester and near completion of work.

Lunch

Lunch

Viv and Verity at the 2007 labsome lunch feast.

Halls Gap at the Y

Halls Gap at the Y

Nico, Arnie and Viv (l to r) cooking up a storm in the Halls Gap YHA during our 2007 labsome field trip.

Iz, Rubia and Ash

Iz, Rubia and Ash

In 2007 we had a lunch for all the labsome students. These three from the class of '06 joined us.

Veronica's visualisation

Veronica's visualisation

In 2006 labsome students collaborated with design students to 'visualise' their honours research. This is one of the outcomes.

Kath's visualisation

Kath's visualisation

In 2006 labsome students collaborated with design students to 'visualise' their honours research. This is one of the outcomes.

Let's Do the Time Step Again

LetsTimeStep.jpg
abstract: 

"Let's Do the Time Step Again" looks at the implications of media form on the ways that content is produced and received.

Through the production of two documentaries exploring stories and ideas of tap dance in Australia, the project compares the waysin which similar content can be used and disseminated in very different ways. The mode of documentary and a series of technologies have been used in order to demonstrate the differences between production and consumption of content.

The first documentary, an audio narrative designed for broadcast on traditional terrestrial radio consists of a single 20 minute soundscape. The second documentary is an interactive, non-linear piece, which requires interaction of the user for the content to be generated.

author/s: 

A pdf of the project exegesis is available below. The radio documentary is also available as a mp3 file below.

Veronica Ridge project

Veronica Ridge project

Fairlie Cottrill thesis

Fairlie Cottrill thesis

Advocacy Journalism: Rethinking Bias, Balance and Neutrality

abstract: 

What follows is a folio of three first-person journalistic features I wrote in my honours year,1 and an exegesis that gives a reflective analysis of these features.

The first feature, ‘Mixed Signals’, was written under academic supervision. It is not thematically linked to the second two, and contains fewer primary sources. This is because — despite repeated attempts — I failed to get ethics clearance for a proposed article about Tamil men charged with terror offences, by late August.

The second and third essays — ‘Guns, Guards & Gates’ and ‘Thought-crime and punishment’ — were written before I secured a supervisor. They have been published.

In all these essays, I intended to write literary journalism, but instead I wrote in the tradition of journaliste engagé, or ‘advocacy journalism’, which is evidence- based but sets out to advance a specific viewpoint.

In examining the methods by which I constructed these features, my exegesis considers whether ‘advocacy journalism’ is an oxymoron or a redundant phrase. It argues that, while in some ways my features take a journalistic approach, they are ultimately not journalism as it is ideally understood.

My exegesis explores where advocacy and journalism meet, where they depart, why this matters, and where method and a more narrative approach might prevent this departure. In doing this, I consider common understandings of bias, balance and fairness.

author/s: 
links: 

supervisor: Margaret Simons

This research consisted of three published literary journalism articles and an exegesis. They are not available via this site due to copyright restrictions, and contain sensitive information concerning informants and sources.

Fairlie Cottrill

Fairlie Cottrill

Having completed my undergraduate degree in Bachelor of Arts (Professional Communication), with a major in public relations, at RMIT in 2005, I am now furthering my interest in the area through my research thesis.

Taking communications seriously: The need for a public relations consultancy catering to Victoria’s nonprofit sector

Fairlie Cottrill thesis
abstract: 

To provide an analysis of the relevance and value of a public relations consultancy catering to Victoria’s nonprofit sector. Public relations campaigns and activities can be implemented at low cost, making it suitable and valuable for nonprofit organisations. Many nonprofit organisations, however, do not use public relations in such a way as to maximise their ability, opportunities, means and reach to achieve their overall goals and objectives. Nonprofit organisations have different needs to the corporate sector, thereby indicating the need for a communications consultancy catering solely to the nonprofit sector. Research into current public relations practices by the nonprofit sector indicates such organisations have a lack of resources, knowledge and interest, thereby demonstrating the potential need for a consultancy that additionally provides public relations education and training opportunities to nonprofit organisations, creating a long term impact.

author/s: 

Future of Food

Veronica Ridge project
abstract: 

The project is a series of four articles, and one shorter story, written specifically for ‘Epicure’, the food and wine section of The Age newspaper. They were published on August 28, October 2 and October 23 (three articles). Each article was researched and written to give readers insight into current food trends and philosophical arguments in line with the project’s title, ‘Future of Food.’ The style of feature writing employed was designed to be suitable for publication in a number of metropolitan daily broadsheets and their food and wine sections. I judged this suitability on the basis of my own experience editing such sections and working in the industry over 34 years. Newspapers that have such sections include The Age, The Australian, Sydney Morning Herald (after publication on 23 October the Sydney Morning Herald’s Good Living section asked for permission to print ‘Moving up the Food Chain’). Other suitable sections within these newspapers would be Insight (The Age), The Inquirer (The Australian) or Spectrum (Sydney Morning Herald). I understand from information I have been given as editor of ‘Epicure’ 4 that the profile of ‘Epicure’ readers is heavily in the AB demographic, which means the readership is skewed towards those who earn more than the average wage and are tertiary qualified. Based on my experience, including 10 years as a section editor, I judge that when our readers pick up The Age they want a good read and are willing to set aside the time to mull over an interesting feature story. They expect to be told something they don’t already know so an important part of editing is identifying current food trends and issues and publishing writing that will capture their attention and inform them in an entertaining and compelling way.

author/s: 
links: 

supervisor: Margaret Simons

This project consisted of four published newspaper articles (as detailed in the abstract). Due to copyright restrictions these are not duplicated here, however they are available in any library that holds copies of The Age, and maybe available via http://www.theage.com.au/news/epicure/

Veronica Ridge

Veronica Ridge

My name is Veronica Ridge. I have worked as a professional journalist for 30 years, mainly for metropolitan newspapers. Even so long after starting out as a cadet reporter at the Melbourne afternoon newspaper The Herald I still get a real thrill daily from my input in the publication of beautifully-crafted words and newsprint pages that live and breathe.

links: 

research: Future of Food

Verity Kowal

Verity

Verity Kowal completed her honours in 2007.

Kath Wilson

Kath Wilson

I've worked as a journalist, an editor, a barmaid, a cleaner, a camp cook and a waitress. I've edited Overland literary magazine and I've contributed features to The Age, The Australian, The Courier-Mail, Good Weekend, Art Monthly, Griffith Review and others. I'm interested in the ways science debates are played out in the media.

Nico Leonard

Nico Leonard

Nico completed the Bachelor of Communication (Media) program at RMIT before continuing as an Honours student and graduating in 2008. Since graduating Nico has divided his time between working in an administrative position at RMIT and travelling throughout Europe, Asia and North America.

Chelvendra Sathieaanandha

Chelvendra Sathieaanandha

Chelvendra - more fondly known as Arnie - to his own demise, suffers from an incurable passion for film. This passion encompasses all creative aspects of film making, particularly writing, directing and the musical content of film. Arnie Sathieaanandha

links: 

research project (film script)
blog

Kris Kam

Kris Kam

Kris hails from sunny Singapore, where he has completed his BA (Mass Communication) and lived for the past 16 years.

Kris Kam

Sarah Demicoli

Sarah Demicoli

After completion of her Bachelor of Communication in Media in 2006, Sarah continued to undertake a year of Honours in Labsome at RMIT University. Throughout her four years of Undergraduate study she developed a passion for Digital Media and the ways in which traditional broadcast media is changing and developing with the developments in technology.

Michaela Jackson

Michaela Jackson

Michaela graduated from the Queensland University of Technology's Bachelor of Business in 1998 where she majored in Communication and Advertising.

links: 

Vivian McGuinness

Vivian McGuinness

I graduated from the Bachelor of Arts in Advertising in 2005 at RMIT. I have always had an interest in visual arts and design. I see Honours as a way to further develop and refine my skills to enable the development of a major project in second semester. I'm interested in investigating any gaps in rural areas where there are a lack of advertising services and looking at why.

Pheona Donohoe

Pheona Donohoe

During my high school years I was an active member of the Melbourne independent music scene; editing Swirl fanzine, running the Scenestar underage shows, playing in Rock'n'Roll High School bands, etc.

Moving pictures: The translation of culture from Hong Kong Cinema to Hollywood

Kris Kam Thesis
abstract: 

The cultures portrayed in films are lost in translation when the big Hollywood studios buy the rights and remake these movies.

Incorrect representation of cultures would result in inaccurate understanding of these cultures by the global audience whose main source of knowledge comes from these Western remakes of films. This might have been, amongst others, the cause of stereotypes amongst most of the large audience which has been accepting the inaccurate portrayals as accurate depictions

In this proposed thesis, I hope to take a deeper look into the stories and scripts that have since moved across the Pacific - remodeled/compromised, to allow a greater general understanding.There is a growing trend of Hollywood studios bringing in scripts and stories from Asia (*looking to go into focus – proposed area: Hong Kong cinema) and how the translation of culture is taking place as these studios look to remake the films while losing bits and pieces of the aforementioned culture.

author/s: 
links: 

supervisor: Catherine Gomes

The thesis is available as a pdf below.

Adrian Miles

Adrian Miles

Adrian Miles is the coordinator of the Bachelor of Communication, Honours program (labsome). He is a senior lecturer in the School of Applied Communication at RMIT. Very interested in interactive video, hypertext, and the ways in which digital technology allows for the development of new forms of pedagogy and knowledge production and dissemination in humanities research.

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